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PBS
Sep 5, 2010 9:00am PDT
resemble life on earth. what does the evolution of life on our planet tell us about the likelihood that alien civilizations exist? in the second of a two-part series, we will ask one of the originators of the dark matter theory, dr. joel primack and nancy ellen abrahams. q >>> this is the second session with two extraordinary people, nancy abrahams wosay lawyer, a song writer, a spouse, and the coauthor of this volume, which is quite breathtaking. the view from the center of the universe. discovering our extraordinariy place in the cosmows. a new book. -- cosmos. highly placed and the coauthor is sitting right here, his name is joel preand he is one of the world's most successful and recognized cosmonthlygists, astro first cysts. and this is a tour of the universe benefiting by the extraordinary breakthroughs of a series of telescopes, the head of which is the leading telescope is the hubble telescope which is still functioning. now, the hubble is a product of nasa. so you must have high regard for nasa? is that deminished in any way? >> all of us scientists are enormously grateful for
PBS
Sep 3, 2010 9:00pm PDT
used them sparingly, but president obama has appointed special envoys to deal with everything from climate change to the closing of guantanamo bay. but with special envoys come special problems. >> the dger of, of having only special envoys is that you, is that you get mixed signals, you get wires crossed. but at the end of the day, i think that's a risk worth taking. >> will the obama administration's reliance on these special negotiators advance u.s. goals in places like afghanistan and the middle east, or are there too many cooks in the kitchen? next, on great decisions. >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international and the european commission. great decis
PBS
Aug 31, 2010 11:00pm PDT
using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systemsffect decision-making and learning. he is a professor of neuroscience at cambridge university and a fe
PBS
Sep 3, 2010 9:30pm PDT
more important than editorial judgment? where is the drive for speed and mobility taking us? >> if online journalism came in a very fast, packaged vehicle, if turning to that next page of the news was as easy as turning the page of a magazine or a newspaper, we'd see people consuming even more news online. >> how is technology changing the way we produce, share, and find the news? that's our question today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more voices is always better for our industry, and more ways of distributing and more ways of reaching people and more ways that people can consume our media. >> so you're just gonna get everything, and you as a consumer have to choose. >> from the newseum in washington, d.c., this is "the future of news." welcome to the knight studio and our conversation about media and news in the digital age. i'm frank sesno. joining me today are two groundbreaking and digitally savvy reporters. mara schiavocampo of nbc is the first digital journalist in
PBS
Sep 22, 2010 11:00pm PDT
july 2010, sort of outlining how you sasort of the new world order, to use a high faluting word. tell me what forces are at work and how does russia adjust to them? >> well, certainly i believe we would all agree that the world is changing. it's not only globalizing but becoming more and more competitive. new centers of economic power, financial power appear and certainly with economic and financial might comes political influence. and that's what we call multipolarity in progress and that certainly must be taken into account by all series foreign policy planners. the united states, i think, under the obama administration understands much better need to build coalition which was already evident during the bush administration time, but the obama foreign policy said very clearly that it must be multilateral i it must take into account the existence of problems with which the united states with all of its assets. >> rose: does that offer opportunities for the united states and russia to cooperate in ways that it has not before? >> i think it does. and not only for the united states and r
PBS
Sep 3, 2010 11:00pm PDT
allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developeways to pair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called cybernetics. john craw krauer, his work
PBS
Sep 24, 2010 6:30pm PDT
>>> hi, everyone, welcome to the "journal" on dw-tv. >> thank you for joining us. >> the helines -- iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad repeats his assertion that washington planned the 9/11 terrorist attacks. >> petrobras raises $70 billion to fund offshore oil reserves. m and the first athletes had to the commonwealth games and concerns that india is not up to staging the event. i >>> u.s. president barack obama has said that there are a host of options available to the united states and its allies if sanctions against iran failed to lead to cooperation on its nuclear program. thursday in his speech to the un general assembly, obama called on iran to resume dialogue with world powers regarding its nuclear programs. for his part, iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad repeated his claims that washington orchestrated the september 11 attacks. >> iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad address the media friday on the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly. he repeated his claims that the united states government was responsible for the september 11 terror attacks in 2001. on thursd
PBS
Sep 12, 2010 9:00am PDT
member of us too, too, correct. >> yes. >> what does that support group do? >> it's to help the men diagnosed with prostate cancer, us too is made up of prostate cancer survivors in total. >> you mean the psychological conditions that occur after surgery or after treatment or even acknowledge that you have prostate cancer? >> what we do primarily is offer counseling to men diagnosed with it, our case studies if you will, tell them about our situation, what we had. and primarily try to explain to them the various options that they have open for them. we have a very close association with urologists throughout all of our chapters. my own case, for example, i have the chapter and the urology clinic sponsors us at andrews air force base. >> uh-huh. >> they will tell a newly diagnosed patient a group in tandem a list of counselors of men who are survivors and recommend to them they contact one of us and talk to them. >> how withdrawed when you discovered you had prostate cancer. >> 62. >> how long before it took before you you underwent the total removal of the prostate gland, right doct
PBS
Sep 20, 2010 5:30pm PDT
complaints commission. scott worden, thank you for joining us tell us what you saw this weekend during the voting. >> well, i was stationed in kabul as an observer. and i visited about ten different stations throughout the city, some in more rural areas, some right in the heart of town. and in the polling stations that i saw, there were relatively few problems. there were plenty of voters. the procedures went along smoothly. and really people were out to vote and were-- seemed to be happy with the process. >> ifill: so how was the turnout. i heard reports that turnout was supposed to be considered spott >> yes, i think that's true. certainly the areas that i was seeing had good security. they were right around kabul and there were very visible police presence around the city. so it is not surprising that the turnout was relatively good. i think most of the polling stations we saw were at least half full. however, as you know, the security situation in much of the country throughout the country was a lot worse. and that had a significant impact on turnout. and i think that turnout can be ex
PBS
Sep 22, 2010 10:00pm PDT
connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could no longer ignore. so it was bankrupting familie
PBS
Sep 28, 2010 5:00pm PDT
jong un studied in switzerland for several years. at school, he used the name pak u.n. and it is said he identified him self as theon of the north korean ambassador to switzerland. one of his former classmates says he was polite and quick to learn the german language. kim jong un apparently enjoyed playing basketball and dreamed of becoming a professional player. kim jong un is said to have returned to pyongyang around 2000 and to have attended university in the north korean capital. no information has been available on his whereabouts since that time. there is speculation that kim jong-il has chosen jong un to succeed him due to his son's leadership abilities and strong mindedness. china's special envoy to the six-party talks has said he heard that kim jong un is tall, like his grandfather, kim ill song who established communist rule in north korea. >> we are covering issues regarding the korean peninsula and thank you very much for joining us. north korea has named kim jong-il's third son vice chairman of the central military committee of the worker's party, a key post. tell us
PBS
Sep 7, 2010 5:00pm PDT
better use information technology, they're launching a council to promote i.t.-based administrative services. the city of seoul called tuesday's meeting. the south korean capital has computerized most of its services including the issuance of resident certificates. >> i expect the power of i.t. to create a wave of mutual collaboration that will reach out to every city around the world. >> the mayor also expressed hope the council would provide business opportunities for south korean firms. the meeting featured an exhibit of cutting edge service technology developed by south korea's samsung and lgl electronics, among others. it included a global positioning system monitor that shows the wait times at bus stops. also on display was a system that sends hospital prescriptions to a pharmacy online so that patients can pick up medication without a long wait. >>> japan's panasonic has developed a portable camera-mounted navigation system that takes pictures and provides information about most tourist spots and other places. the product jointly developed with a travel guidebook publisher ca
PBS
Sep 1, 2010 11:00pm PDT
somewhat to help guide us. last month, we talked about positive emotions such as reward and pleasure. tonight we turn to fear and anxiety. human have evolved to feel fear in response to danger and to exhibit aggression when threatened. today fear and aggression can be found throughout the animal kingdom. by studying these emotions in animals, we may one day learn how to control violent behavior in ourselves. last month we discussed how the brap's pleasure circuits are corrupted by addiction. this evening we will learn how the brain's fear circuits go awry in clinical syndromes of fear such as chronic anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. human anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental illnesss in the country. nearly one-third of all americans will exhibit symptoms of an anxiety disorder at least once during his or her lifetime. post-traumatic stress disorder's also becoming more prevalent. more than 40,000 war veterans are currently affected by this illness with thousands more cases going unreported. thankfully, progress has been made in understanding the biology of
PBS
Sep 6, 2010 11:00pm PDT
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical inventiois about. >> i think
PBS
Sep 16, 2010 5:30pm PDT
flooding was horrific but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. at's something i add life >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcas
PBS
Sep 19, 2010 11:00am PDT
that is how it should be. most of the original and commonly used names here are german, while most of the italian names were imposed during the fascist rule of mussolini. in recent years, the local chapters of the alpine club every new some 36,000 signs, many of them only in german, which bothers some italian hikers. >> if the signposts are only in german, it limits the number of people who want to come here. lots of people from central italy, for example, would have a lot of problems with that. >> in rome, the italian minister for regional affairs has told the south eta residents -- the south tyrol people to use different sign posts. it is belligerent statement is guaranteed to rob people the wrong way. south tyrol has not come to terms with its past. the release of mussolini on the local finance building it is seen as another case of italian arrogance. this person sits in the local parliament for prime minister silvio berlusconi's parliament. he is not comfortable with the debate surrounding the signposts. >> this has been in italy almost 100 years. i don't say this is italy, like t
PBS
Sep 6, 2010 5:30pm PDT
, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off, president obama we
PBS
Sep 17, 2010 11:00pm PDT
, you could find out through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the live
PBS
Sep 9, 2010 5:30pm PDT
god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the weekend bur
PBS
Sep 24, 2010 8:30pm PDT
july. christina roma was next. the white house is also expecting rahm emanuel to leave the use to run for mayor of chicago. >> if rahm emanuel leaves, he will be the fourth of president obama's closest advisers to have left since july. question, after 20 months, is this presidential staff turnover normal? pat buchanan. >> this is not terribly unusual if you have a presidency in trouble. john, when you came into the white house, '71, john connolly came in, dave kennedy was out. nixon closed the goal window, let the dollar flow. he sent arthur burns to the federal reserve. they gunned the money supply to $23 billion deficits. that was enormously dramatic in terms of a change. this is nothinlike that. rahm is going out there because there's an opening for mayor's office and secondly, because he has been hammered and had a bad time. but i don't think this is extraordinarily unusual. i don't see any signs of panic here. >> a vietnam war on his hands. >> nixon, our election was disappointing and he took that big move. john connolly was lyndon johnson's man that had taken texas away from him
PBS
Sep 20, 2010 6:30pm PDT
, but it is also about how this money is used. it needs to be used in a more effective way. that is what chancellor merkel said today. she is talking a lot about it. and she has a different agenda. she's talking to many, many heads of state and heads of government because germany is in for one of the non-permanent seats in the u.n. security council, up against portugal and canada. two seats and three countries. so she's campaigning for germany to get one of those seats in to douse an1. >>hat was from new york. the surge of support for a far- right party in sweden's national elections on sunday is sparking concern in protests in the country that until now has prided itself on openness and tolerance. the anti-democrat sweden democrat party got more than 5% of the vote, enabling them to parliament for the first time. the prime minister, center-right coalition, has lost its absolute majority and is looking for a potential partners to lead a minority government. >> the verdict of the swedish papers was as unanimous as it was despondent. the word chaos dominated the headlines. the success of t
PBS
Sep 5, 2010 11:30am PDT
, this might be the case in the us where the pet food scandals, the melamine scandals certainly generated very, very high attention in the press and in the media. >>reporter: the reality of the "made in china" curse isn't lost on aigo, a popular maker of usb memory sticks, mp6 players and digital cameras. as an olympics and formula one sponsor, aigo enjoys a high profile in mainland china. but its chairman accepts that to be credible, globally, the bar for chinese companies is high, and so, until aigo has a strong overseas service network, he's holding-off on expanding abroad. >>feng: many, many companies want to sell products fast, but no service! it's a disaster for brands. because only if you have good service, you can give satisfaction to the consumer. so we need a partner. >>reporter: chinese exporters like white goods maker haier and beer maker tsingtao are strongly focused on service and brand awareness. that's why they're on the short list of chinese companies that foreigners might recognise. other players have raised their profiles by making big ticket acquisitions - li
PBS
Sep 5, 2010 11:00am PDT
, i only eat halal. i used to order only fish when i came here. now i can eat meat. >> considering how many muslims live here is a good thing they serve halal meat. >> it is revolutionary to see a non-muslim chain offering halal. that is what is special. non-muslims have realized this is a gap in the market. it is great for us. >> some french people are unsettled by this development. for example, one has written a letter of protest to his municipal government, citing the french law insuring separation of religion and state. >> we have been upholding the separation for centuries in the public arena. we are citizens of french -- citizens of france and you know where our religious affiliations on our sleeve. this principle is at risk and many citizens are worried by these developments. >> even this nearby japanese restaurant has gone halal. stores and restaurants are no longer a niche market. you used to have to head to the back streets of immigrant neighborhoods. those days are long gone. halal is mainstream whether non- muslims like it or not. >> anybody buying a burger here is auto
PBS
Sep 5, 2010 11:00pm PDT
what arabs think. >> i never thought i'd see it again, frankly. none of us did. >> yes, israel was quite justified. >> chanting death to the jews. >> anti-semitic anti-jewish things being said and displayed at that rally. >> this is america. it's free speech. i think people should be allowed to say whatever they want. ♪ >> it's the summer of 2006. this is beirut, lebanon. this is haifa, israel. across a globe in michigan, this is dearborn. and this is southfield. dearborn and southfield are suburbs of detroit. dearborn has the largest concentration of arabs outside the middle east. and southfield has a significant concentration of jewish people. and now that we're at war with ea other, relations between the two communities at times reflect the tensions of the middle east. some of these tensions are covered in the local newspapers. >> last year we had an editorial that was published. it was published right on super bowl day in detroit. >> we are a right of center conservative page. >> and the editorial is on sunday, he says that -- that palestinians have lust for jewish blood. >>
PBS
Sep 2, 2010 5:30pm PDT
five months after parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore lo at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina,
PBS
Sep 1, 2010 5:30pm PDT
, margaret warner spoke with vice president biden. they met in a building north of baghdad that used to be saddam hussein' hunting lodge. >> mr. vice president, thank you for having us. >> happy to be with you, margaret. i really am. >> reporter: last night president obama said we have met our responsibility in iraq. we've been here a while. a lot of iraqis say to you, "you haven't. you came to our country, dictatorship, but at least we had services and we had security. now we don't have either." what do you say to them? i mean have we met our responsibility? >> the vast majority of iraqis i speak to acknowledge there is a great deal more security than there ever has been since the beginning of the war, number one. number two, the president said we have met our combat responsibilities, he means by that we have trained up 650,000 iraqi forces, and i might add, crack special forces, who really can do the job. but the president also pointed out that this is just the beginning of our engagement with iraq. we are ramping up our diplomatic and civilian engagement. we want to participate in helpi
PBS
Sep 8, 2010 5:00pm PDT
>>> hello there. welcome to "newsline." glad you to join us. it's thursday, september 9th, 8:00 a.m. in tokyo. i'm catherine kobayashi. >>> energy giant bp has concluded that the catastrophic gulf oil spill was caused by a linked series of mechanical and human failures involving multiple companies. its report has immediately been met by a backlash. the investigation was conducted by a team of bp and outside experts, and disclosed on wednesday. the report blames eight interlinked findings for the incident or accident including the poor quality of cement used to contain hydrocarbons at the sea bottom and the rig crew's delay in noticing irregular ates. outgoing bp representative tony hayward says a series of events led to the tragedy. he insisted transocean and others are responsible. transocean immediately issued a comment calling the report a self-serve attempt to conceal the real cause of the explosion that started the disaster. it said bp had made a series of cost-saving decisions that increased the risk of an accident. the accident in april in the gulf of mexico left 11 dead and
PBS
Sep 24, 2010 9:00pm PDT
decisions. >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association- inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international, and the european commission. great decisions is produced in association with the university of delaware. >> and now from our studios, here is ralph begleiter. >> welcome to great decisions. i'm ralph begleiter. joining us to discuss russia and its neighbors are nina kruscheva, professor of international affairs at the new school university. and william sweet, a journalist at the ieee spectrum and great decisions 2010 briefing book author. thanks to both of you for being with us. >> thank you. >> you know, for decades after the end of the cold-- at the end of world war ii, the theme of international relations was moscow versus washington. and here in the united states these days, i th
PBS
Sep 10, 2010 10:00pm PDT
going to move us forward versus the policies that will get us back into a mess, then i think the democrats will do very well. >> holman: one such policy is mr. obama's push to extend middle-class tax cuts, something he argued should garner bipartisan support. >> 97% of americans make less than $250,000 a year... $250,000 a year or less. and i'm saying we can give those families-- 97%-- permanent tax relief. now, that seems like a common- sense thing to do. and what i've got is the republicans holding middle-class tax relief hostage because they're insisting we've got to give tax relief to millionaires and billionaires to the tune of about $100,000 per millionaire, >> holman: on health care, the president was pressed about a government report showing health care costs on the rise. that, despite the passage of legislation aimed at bending down the cost curve. >> we didn't think that we were going to cover 30 million people for free, but that the long-term trend, in terms of how much the average family is going to be paying for health insurance, is going to be improved as a conseque
PBS
Sep 15, 2010 11:00pm PDT
, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence th the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think it's going to work with independents or republicans
PBS
Sep 5, 2010 12:30pm PDT
? >> no, in fact it probably made the world situation and for us less safe. saddam hussein was despicable, he actually control the country and there was no doubt that there when he was in power because there would have been a threat to them. therefore, but the captor policy provided to iran and the control over terrorism in his own country was probably in a cold hearted national security way beneficial to us. not the other way around. he did not have weapons of mass destruction. since we had a good inspection system and he did not have weapons of mass destruction, for us, it was probably not a bad situation. it was terrible for the iraqi people. >> the concern for the iraqis is an incredible and asia. --amnesia. before the war, the clinton administration was attacked relentlessly. thousands of iraqis were dying because of the embargo, especially iraqi children, tens of thousands. if you want to make a tally of their losses, you have to remember what the situation was at the time. secondly, as the criteria of iraq never attacking us, they did not attack us and the gulf war either. ey iaded
PBS
Aug 31, 2010 6:30pm PDT
. jason, thank you for talking with us. first of all, they caught him alive. how significant is that? >> it is very significant because obviously he can be important in terms of other investigations, in terms of digging in to the workings of these cartels. yes, it's very important that they caught him alive. and the hope is that they will be able to get more information about the functioning of other cells, other parts of the organization that had splintered after the one man was gunned down by the mexican marines in december of 2009. >> woodruff: how big a victory is this for the mexican government? >> this is really huge in terms of the timing. for president calderon, he really needed a good-news story at the moment. last week you had the worst massacre in the entire drug car with 72 migrants killed by the zetas, one of the drug cartels that operates primarily just below brownsville, texas. they actually operate all over mexico. that's sort of their home base. they're accused of gunning down 72 migrants. that's obviously the worst massacre that has occurred in what is an incredibly
PBS
Sep 17, 2010 6:30pm PDT
traveling with the pope. i asked him to tell us more about the pontiff's speech. >> it was a very vigorous speech and appeal for a dialogue between faith and religion to establish a moral norms in society. it is the old argument that he keeps repeating. he did it at his first famous lecture, the dialogue between faith and reason did of the catholic church believes it is possible to establish objeives, univsal norms. the pope pointed out that to settle for pragmatic short-term solutions of ethical norms is inadequate, as reflected in the disastrous financial crisis that we experienced in the last year. not everybody will agree with him. particularly fundamentalists, religious and fundamentalists in dislike the idea of a dialogue between faith and reason to about 108 of them were down here this afternoon when the pope arrived at westminster abbey. they shouted antichrist, antichrist, as he ented westminster ave. >> one more can you tell us about the arrests that were made today? >> apparently, they are algerian nationals, at least five of the mark. they were working for a private co
PBS
Sep 23, 2010 10:00pm PDT
people, the american people will want to work with us to come to grips with these challenges that face our country. >> reporter: back at the capitol, reaction from democrats was swift and critical. house majority leader steny hoyer. >> pledges are easy to make, but the american voter needs to look at performance. who left a $5.6 trillion surplus for the last administration that was then squandered by two wars, two tax cuts and a drug prescription bill which we like but all of which was unpaid for? all of which was unpaid for. so i say to my friends on the other side talk is cheap. >> reporter: hoyer's fellow marylander-- chris van hollen-- is in charge of the mid-term campaign for house democrats. he called the republican plan just "more of the same." >> what they've done is taken eight years of bush administration policies and recycled them and repackaged them and they're trying to sell it as something different when if you look very carefully at the key provisions, it's those failed policies all over again. >> reporter: republican leaders dismissed the democratic darts. they said the
PBS
Sep 14, 2010 5:30pm PDT
one once jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these
PBS
Aug 31, 2010 5:30pm PDT
. john, tell us what sort of differences do you think these changes are going to actually make. >> there is a range of measures, actually, in these new regulations, which are intended to prevent cases of child abuse occurring. it is difficult to see how effective they are going to be. obviously the intention is good. theaspect thais going to be grabbing headlines in germany in tomorrow's this papers will be the fact that the german newspapers have committed themselves in all 27 diocese to contact the police to report cases of child abuse to the police as soon as there is a reasonable suspicion that child abuse has taken place, with the sole exception, they say, and this should be a rare exception -- if the victim himself or herself insists upon the police not being informed. that is very unusual, particarlyinceany people do not realize there is no legal obligation whatsoever for anyone to report a case of sexual abuse. this is a particular restraint the church is voluntarily placing on itself. >> i have spoken myself to a lot of child sex abuse victims, especially in the church, and woul
PBS
Sep 14, 2010 11:00pm PDT
economy which will do bad things to us over the long run? >> well, look, i hope so. the reason is that without that, we're off to a fiscal crisis. and that's a situation we never want to find ourselves in. now the other benefit that we didn't discuss is if you need additional revenueimply canceling the existing tax cuts after some period of time after? >> after two years. the key thing is that there's a definitive ending period in that there's a commitment very clear up front including a veto threat that you not extend it thereafter. the other benefit of that is all that would do is return the tax code to the form that.... >> charlie: in the clinton years. >> in the 1990s. you can't argue that that will cause economic ka catastrophe. in the highly politicized debate over what happens when revenue changes take effect it's beneficial to be able to point back and say all we're doing is return to go the 1990s. >> charlie: returning means the following. if you today eliminated the tax cuts for people who made more than $250,000, you would gain how much revenue? >> about $250,000? about $35
PBS
Sep 21, 2010 5:30pm PDT
included james inhoff of oklahoma. >> it's a political mistake, a dumb thing to do to try to use the defense authorization bill in times of war to advance a liberal agenda. what is that? to have open gays serving in the military. >> lehrer: supporters of repeal argued the bill's language would authorize it only after a pentagon survey of troops and after the president certifies morale would not be affected. connecticut independent democrat joseph lieberman. >> that provision does not go into effect until 60 days after the president of the united states, the secretary of defense, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff all certify in writing that repeal is consistent with the standards of military readiness, military effective, unit cohesion and recruiting, and retention of the armed forces. >> lehrer: the president, back in his state of the union address, made clear he wants repeal. >> this year i will work with congress and our military to finally repeal the law that denies gay americans the right to serve the country they love because of who they are. >> lehrer: as for the pu
PBS
Sep 4, 2010 12:00pm PDT
reversal, young women in most us cities are now out-earning their male peers. this, according to a just-released analysis of 2008 census bureau data, finding single, young, childfree women take home, on average, 8% more income than their male counterparts. the income imbalance was initially found in the country's biggest cities such as new york and san francisco, but has since broadened. to smaller cities, too. this new trend is found in white- and blue-collar industries and includes the fast-growing metropolitan areas with large immigrant populations. what's behind the shift? experts point to the growing ranks of women who attend college and move on to high-paying jobs. but while they may be earning more, fewer are doing it on wall street. the number of high-earning female finance workers is dwindling fast due to the recession. this, despite a decrease in sex discrimination charges and a rise in corporate programs to attract and retain women. over the last decade, the finance industry has lost three percent of its female workers while the number of men increased by 10 percent. wha
PBS
Sep 19, 2010 12:30pm PDT
burial. bureau. >> thank you for joining us. goon peterson is off this week. this week's election was topped by christine o'donnell for the united states senate nomination in delaware. she won with the backing of sarah palin. how do you feel two days later? >> bill buckley said to support the most right-wing candidate that was elected pope. i think the republicans broke thatule. it could cost republicans control of the senate. >> it looks like we have this anger we are talking about. this is a temper tantrum that ran amok. some tea party candidates have come up and then nominated and have sent a message and made a statement and can win and compete in the fall. in this case, she will have to run again not just the democratic party in delaware but much of the republican party as well them n. >> ronald reagan said that shall not speak ill of another republican in public. this is also what jim demand said about others he served with. he said he has been in the majority with republicans who don't have principles. >> what bigger shot can you take? >> ronald reagan had the 80% rule which is
PBS
Sep 27, 2010 5:00pm PDT
africa. senegal used to be a relatively wealthy country by african standards. here in the slums of dakar, the capital city, 80% of the residents make less than $2 a day. less than 10% of the people have steady jobs. here is the poor area in the center of dakar, many migrants who left their homeland because of desertfy indication are living here. this man came here with his family five years ago from a village 300 kilometers away. >> translator: this is all the money i have left. this would only buy me a cup of coffee. >> translator: the village just didn't get any rain. the land turned barren, and nothing grew. >> in recent years, desertification has severely damaged farmland. many people have lost their homes or means to make a living and so they migrate to the cities joining the large number of people already living in poverty. >> a group of people have come together. they're working to create a strip of land 15 kilometers wide and stretching 7,600 across the african continent. the goal is to plant trees that grow well in dry climates and reforest the land near the villages. here
PBS
Sep 19, 2010 9:00am PDT
have americans popped so many pills. have psycho pharmaceuticals turned us into a zombie nation? or should we just go with the flow and embrace the brave new world of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the poi
PBS
Sep 24, 2010 11:00pm PDT
important d facebook is a consequee and very impressive comny. and social infmation will be used by gooe and by others, i should add, to make the quality of t results, the qlity of the experience that much better. e pore we foe about what your friendso with your permission, and i need sayhat about 500 times, we canctually use that t improve the experiencyou have o getting informatio that you ce about. in our case what we're actuallyo something building social information into allf ourroducts. so it won't ba social network the way peop think of facebook but rather social infortion about who your friends a, people that you interactith. and we have various ways in which we wl be collecting that informaon. >>e continue with the film wall street money never eeps with the director all i vertone and twof the jars josh brolin d ia laouf. the 2 o 008 market is re difficult to understand wi credit default swaps and insurae and all tha stuff. but we made it a backgrou. that's the way we treat it. we treed the crisis, it's all there. you parallel it. but we kept our eye on the foreground which is th
PBS
Sep 1, 2010 10:00pm PDT
pay raise, a six-hour day, a coast-wide contract, and a working hall run by us... human dignity, rank and file democracy and human dignity. but the shipowners, they thought we wanted revolution. well, at least that's what their papers said. [bell ringing] oh, yeah, here's another one. "the communist army plans the destruction of railroad and highway facilities to paralyze transportation and communication, while san francisco and the bay area are made a focal point in a red struggle for revolution and control of the government." [dramatic musical flourish] it's amazing the fear a bunch of wharf rats could stir up, and on may 9th, we went out on our first coast-wide strike, and the day of the shape-ups, the kickbacks, and the blue books was over. [light guitar music] ♪ >> ♪ step by step ♪ the longest march ♪ can be won ♪ can be won >> ♪ many stones ♪ can form an arch ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> ♪ and by union ♪ what we will ♪ can be accomplished still >> ♪ drops of water ♪ turn a mill ♪ singly none ♪ singly none >> we don't intend to repeat our former
PBS
Sep 10, 2010 9:30pm PDT
states according to nielsen research, and the number is growing every day. easy-to-use software is helping citizen journalists tell their stories, and professionals are using citizen sources more and more. >> we treat them as reliable sources of information, but, like we would with the police source, the courthouse source, and the capitol hill source, we verify that. >> ...these images literally streaming into us here at cnn. >> as traditional news media grapple with sinking budgets and shrinking newsrooms, can citizen journalism help fill the void? what role should citizen journalists play? that's our topic today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more eyes, more ears, more voices out there, and a more sophisticated audience as well, because it's the audience that's gonna keep us all honest. >> when citizen journalists want to be trusted, they have to do certain things to earn that trust. >> from the newseum in washington d.c., this is "the future of news." and welcome to the
PBS
Sep 19, 2010 10:00am PDT
. i'm bob abernathy. it's good to have you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke tes with the roma catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedi
PBS
Sep 28, 2010 12:00am PDT
now!" >> it is a proud time for all of us as colombians. i want to share with all of you this infinite luck, to have my children next to me after seven years of not sing them. >> after more thanix years of captivity, being held hostage by colombian rebel group farc, former colombian presidential candidate ingrid betancourt was released in july 2008. she has just published a memoir "even silence has an end: my six years of captivity in the colombian jungle." we will speak with her to go first, the fbi raids eight homes and offices of anti-war activists in chicago and minneapolis. >> they wanted to see things related to trips to colombia and the middle east and related to the antiwar committee. >> we have done nothing wrong. [applause] on the other hand, the fbi asked today as they have always acted, to intimidate and disrupt the anti-war movement in the movement for peace and justice. >> we will be joined by two of the activists whose homes were raided, jess sundin of minneapolis and joe isobaer of chicago. will speak with former fbi special agents coleen rowley. all of that an
PBS
Sep 13, 2010 11:00pm PDT
, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we shouldavoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can use the word change. >> words matter because it
PBS
Sep 12, 2010 10:00am PDT
funding for religion & ethics "newsweek"ly is provided by -- >>> welcome. it's good to he you with us. as the country observes the ninth anniversary of the september 11th terrorist attacks, there's been an extraordinary national conversation about the challenges of religious diversity and the boundaries of tolerance. there were protests and condemnations from around the world over a small independent florida church's threatened plan to burn the koran. secretary of state hillary clinton called the plan disrespectful and disgraceful. and general david petraeus, the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan and defense secretary robert gates said the act could endanger american troops. the debate came on top of another controversy over plans to build an islamic cultural center near the site of ground zero in new york. at a news conference on friday, president obama called for religious tolerance. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other, and i will do everything that i can as long as i'm president of the united states to remind the american people that we are on
PBS
Sep 26, 2010 9:00am PDT
have coalition support in iraq. he was well aware of the time that it took the us. to go from revolution to government, over a decade. he was interested in lincoln and the civil war. we talked a lot about lincoln and saw lincoln documents. then he had a very surprised q. he wanted to see documents of the precedence apparentltl really fascinates him, john quincy adams so we showed -- >> did he explain his interest? >> well, he didn't beyond the point that he was fascinated with the father son aspect of this adams senior -- bush senior, bush junior. >> i see. did he comment on anything like transparency of his from the documents? >> well, we tried to explain that we're an access agency and that americans are entitled to see the their country. i think in fact that i've been invited to come to bag dand see if we can't bring a delegation to advice them on organizing the archives which we may do. >> you've had an awful lot of experience before the archives with the arrival of measure of freedom to russia. the yeltsin and earlier in fact when you headed up the center for democracies,
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